Three Generations – The Cohort Studies

Today we look into the three different studies conducted by CLS that will serve as the base data for Jacob.

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1958 National Child Development Study

Principal Investigator: Prof Alissa Goodman

The National Child Development Study (NCDS) follows the lives of 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1958. Also known as the 1958 Birth Cohort Study, it collects information on physical and educational development, economic circumstances, employment, family life, health behaviour, well being, social participation and attitudes.

The surveys

Since the birth survey in 1958, there have been nine further ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 7, 11, 16, 23, 33, 42, 46, 50 and 55. In 2003 (at age 45), 9,000 cohort members also participated in a special bio-medical survey so they could learn more about how development, environments and lifestyles affect people’s health.

The data

The data for all NCDS sweeps is available from the UK Data Service. For more information, see the accessing the data page.

The 1970 British Cohort Study

Principal Investigator: Prof Alice Sullivan

The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) follows the lives of more than 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Over the course of cohort members lives, the BCS70 has collected information on health, physical, educational and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors.

The surveys

Since the birth survey in 1970, there have been eight ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38 and 42. For more information on each of these surveys, visit the surveys pages.

The data

The data for all BCS70 sweeps are available from the UK Data Service. For more information, see the accessing the data page.

The Millennium Cohort Study

Acting Principal Investigator: Dr Morag Henderson
Principal Investigator: Prof Emla Fitzsimons

The Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) is a multi-disciplinary research project following the lives of around 19,000 children born in the UK in 2000-01. It is the most recent of Britain’s world-renowned national longitudinal birth cohort studies. The study has been tracking the Millennium children through their early childhood years and plans to follow them into adulthood. It collects information on the children’s siblings and parents. MCS’s field of enquiry covers such diverse topics as parenting; childcare; school choice; child behaviour and cognitive development; child and parental health; parents’ employment and education; income and poverty; housing, neighbourhood and residential mobility; and social capital and ethnicity.

The surveys

The five surveys of MCS cohort members carried out so far – at age nine months, three, five, seven and eleven years – have built up a uniquely detailed portrait of the children of the new century. The Age 11 Survey took place place in 2012 and resulted in 13,287 productive interviews. This data along with the previous sweeps is available to download from the UK Data Service.

Three sub-studies have also been undertaken, with two reports produced so far: the Health Visitor Survey Report, and the Fertility Survey Report.

CLS is currently carrying out the age 14 survey, which is in field throughout 2015/early 2016. CLS will also carry out a new survey of the MCS cohort at age 17 in 2018.

The data

The data for all MCS sweeps is available from the UK Data Service. For more information, see the accessing the data  page.

 

 

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